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PUBLICATIONS OF THE

BUDDHIST TEXT TRANSLATION SOCIETY

An English Language Catalog­­

 Buddhist Sutras

 Commentarial

 Biographical

  For Children

Music & Novels

VAJRA BODHI SEA

Buddhist Text Translation Society / International Translation Institute

1777 Murchison Drive / Burlingame, California 94010-4504

Phone: (415) 692-5912 / Fax: (415) 692-5056

Email: drbaiti@jps.net


BTTS's Frequently Asked Questions:


What Is the Buddhist Text Translation Society (BTTS)?

Eight Regulations of the BTTS:

Who Is the Dharma Realm Buddhist Association (DRBA)?

The Founder, Master Hua, On Propagating Buddha Dharma

Where Are The DRBA's Way-places?

How Can I Order Buddhist Books?

How Do I Show Respect for Buddhist Texts?

Sutras in English Translation:  (Mahayana Sutras On-line)


 

What Is the Buddhist Text Translation Society (BTTS)?

When Buddhism first came to China from India, one of the most important tasks required for its establishment was the translation of the Buddhist scriptures from Sanskrit into Chinese. This work involved a great many people, such as the renowned monk National Master Kumarajiva (fifth century), who led an assembly of over 800 people to work on the translation of the Tripitaka (Buddhist canon) for over a decade. Because of the work of individuals such as these, nearly the entire Buddhist Tripitaka of over a thousand texts exists to the present day in Chinese.

Now the banner of the Buddha's Teachings is being firmly planted in Western soil, and the same translation work is being done from Chinese into English. Since 1970, the Buddhist Text Translation Society (BTTS) has been making a paramount contribution toward this goal. Aware that the Buddhist Tripitaka is a work of such magnitude that its translation could never be entrusted to a single person, the BTTS, emulating the translation assemblies of ancient times, does not publish a work until it has passed through four committees for primary translation, revision, editing, and certification. The leaders of these committees are Bhikshus (monks) and Bhikshunis (nuns) who have devoted their lives to the study and practice of the Buddha's teachings. For this reason, all of the works of the BTTS put an emphasis on what the principles of the Buddha's teachings mean in terms of actual practice, not just theory.

The translations of canonical works by the Buddhist Text Translation Society are accompanied by extensive commentaries by the Venerable Tripitaka Master Hsüan Hua and are available in softcover only unless otherwise noted. 


Eight Regulations of

the Buddhist Text Translation Society


What makes BTTS translations special are the high standards that all translators, editors and staff aspire towards:

A translator must free himself or herself from the motives of personal fame and reputation.

A translator must cultivate an attitude free from arrogance and conceit.

A translator must refrain from aggrandizing himself or herself and denigrating others.

A translator must not establish himself or herself as the standard of correctness and suppress the work of others with his or her faultfinding.

A translator must take the Buddha-mind as his or her own mind.

A translator must use the wisdom of the selective Dharma-eye to determine true principles.

A translator must request the elder virtuous ones of the ten directions to certify his or her translation.

A translator must endeavor to propagate the teachings by printing sutras, shastra texts, and vinaya texts when the translations are certified as being correct.


 

Who Is the Dharma Realm Buddhist Association (DRBA)?

(formerly known as the Sino-American Buddhist Association)

The Dharma Realm Buddhist Association (DRBA) was formed in 1959 to bring the orthodox teachings of the Buddha to the entire world.

At all of its monasteries, DRBA offers a rigorous schedule of Buddhist practice seven days a week from 4:00 A.M. to 10:00 P.M. The schedule includes at least three hours of group meditation, two and a half hours of group recitation, and a one-and-a-half-hour-long lecture on the Buddhist scriptures each day. There are also daily courses in Buddhist and canonical language studies, week-long intensive recitation and meditation sessions, and a three to ten week meditation session in the winter. Residents gain a thorough understanding of the main teachings of all the major schools of Buddhism, develop skill in scriptural languages, and become adept at a wide variety of spiritual practices. The foundation of the practice is a high standard of ethics: All residents hold the Five Buddhist Precepts which prohibit killing of any living being (includes vegetarianism), stealing, sexual misconduct, lying, and taking intoxicants (including alcohol, drugs, and tobacco). These activities are offered through a government-approved three-year Sangha (monastic) and two-year Laity Training Program. The Sangha Training Program provides partial fulfillment of requirements for receiving the 250 Precepts of a Bhikshu or the 348 Precepts of a Bhikshuni through traditional ordination procedures.

One of DRBA's major tasks is the translation of the main Buddhist scriptures into the world's languages, primarily English. To date, under the auspices of the Buddhist Text Translation Society, DRBA has published over one hundred texts in English, Chinese, and Spanish.

DRBA has established various educational and social service programs to promote peace, happiness, and a high standard of ethical conduct for the world. At its main branch, the City of 10,000 Buddhas, are housed Dharma Realm Buddhist University, Developing Virtue Secondary Schools, and Instilling Goodness Elementary Schools.

The spiritual guide of DRBA is its founder, the most Venerable Tripitaka Master Hsüan Hua.


Where Are the DRBA's Way-places?

The Sagely City of 10,000 Buddhas
2001 Talmage Road
P.O. Box 217
Talmage, CA 95481-0217 U.S.A.
Phone: (707) 462-0939 Fax: (707) 462-0949
e-mail:
Main Administration: craig@jps.net

Women's Administration: drbajgh@jps.net
Dharma Realm Buddhist University: drbadrbu@jps.net
Buddhist Text Translation Society/Vajra Bodhi Sea: cttbbtts@jps.net
 

Gold Mountain Sagely Monastery
800 Sacramento Street
San Francisco, CA 94108 U.S.A.
Phone: (415) 421-6117
Fax: (415) 788-6001
e-mail: drbagmm@jps.net
 

Gold Sage Monastery
11455 Clayton Road
San Jose, CA 95127 U.S.A.
Phone: (408) 923-7243
e-mail: drbagsm@jps.net
 

Gold Summit Monastery
233 First Avenue West
Seattle, WA 98119 U.S.A.
Phone: (206) 217-9320
e-mail: drbagsm@worldnet.att.net
 

Gold Wheel Sagely Monastery
235 N. Avenue 58
Los Angeles, CA 90042 U.S.A.
Phone: (213) 258-6668
 

Institute for World Religions / Berkeley Buddhist Monastery
2304 McKinley Avenue
Berkeley, CA 94703 U.S.A.
Phone: (510) 848-3440
Fax: (510) 548-4551
e-mail: paramita@sirius.com
 

International Translation Institute
1777 Murchison Drive
Burlingame, CA 94010-4504 U.S.A.
Phone: (415) 692-5912
Fax: (415) 692-5056
e-mail: drbaiti@jps.net
 

Long Beach Monastery
3361 East Ocean Boulevard
Long Beach, CA 90803 U.S.A.
Phone: (310) 438-8902
e-mail: drbalbsm@aol.com
 

Blessings, Prosperity, & Longevity Monastery
4140 Long Beach Boulevard
Long Beach, CA 90807 U.S.A.
Phone: (310) 595-4966
 

Sagely City of the Dharma Realm
1029 West Capitol Ave.
West Sacramento, CA 95691 U.S.A.
Phone: (916) 374-8268
e-mail: drbacdr@jps.net
 

Avatamsaka Hermitage
11721 Beall Mountain Road
Potomac, MD 20854-1128 U.S.A.
Phone: (301) 299-3693
 

Avatamsaka Sagely Monastery
1009 - 4th Ave. S.W.
Calgary, AB T2P 0K8
Canada
Phone: (403) 234-0644
e-mail: tsoh@cadvision.com
 

Gold Buddha Sagely Monastery
301 East Hastings Street
Vancouver, BC V6A 1P3
Canada
Phone: (604) 684-3754
e-mail: drbagbm@direct.ca
 

Dharma Realm Buddhist Books Distribution Society
11 Floor, 85 Chung-hsiao E. Road,
Sec. 6, Taipei, R.O.C.
Taiwan
Phone: (02) 786-3022
Fax: (02) 786-2674
 

Tze Yun Tung Temple
Batu 5 1/2, Jalan Sungai Besi,
Salak Selatan, 57100 Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia
Phone: (03) 782-6560
Fax: (03) 780-1272
 

Buddhist Lecture Hall
31 Wong Nei Chong Road, Top Floor
Happy Valley
Hong Kong
Phone: 2572-7644

 


 

How Can I Order Buddhist Books?

All orders require prepayment, including postage and handling fees, before they will be shipped to the buyer. Please submit orders to:

Buddhist Text Translation Society
City of 10,000 Buddhas
P.O. Box 217
Talmage, CA 95481-0217
Phone: (707) 462-0939; Fax (707) 462-0949

Postage & Handling:

The following rates for postage and handling apply to orders of six or fewer books. On orders of more than six books, we suggest that purchasers submit their orders for a precise quote on postage and handling costs.

United States: $2.00 for the first book and $0.75 for each additional book. All publications are sent via special fourth class. Allow from two weeks to one month for delivery.

International: $2.50 for the first book and $1.50 for each additional book. All publications are sent via "book rate" or direct mail sack (surface). For countries in which parcels may be lost, such as Indonesia and Malaysia, we suggest orders be sent via registered mail for an additional $3.25 per parcel of ten books each. We are not responsible for parcels lost in the mail. Allow two to three months for delivery.

Most branches of the Dharma Realm Buddhist Association and other retail booksellers also offer Buddhist Text Translation Society publications for sale.

 


 

How Do I Show Respect for Buddhist Texts?

All Buddhist Sutras and books that propagate and reveal the Buddhadharma exist for the purpose of causing people to encounter auspiciousness and avoid harm, to change their falseness and move toward wholesomeness, to understand the cause and effect of the three periods of time, to recognize the original Buddha-nature we are all replete with, to transcend the suffering of being in the sea of birth and death, and to gain rebirth in the Lotus Country of Ultimate Bliss. Therefore, anyone reading such texts should bring forth a mind of gratitude and reflect upon how hard it is to encounter them. One should wash one's hands before handling these texts and wipe clean the surface upon which one places them. By being as reverent and sincere toward Buddhist texts as one would be when encountering the Buddhas or gods or as when one is beside one's teacher, one can attain limitless benefits. But if one is shamelessly negligent, sloppy and disrespectful, headstrong and prejudiced, and from such falseness gives rise to slander, then one's offenses will fill up the skies and one will suffer endless retributions. So all people of the world, please heed this advice: Stay far away from creating offenses and seek always for what is beneficial in order to leave suffering and obtain bliss.

 

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